A White Family with a Black Slave… Not again!

Almeria Campbell as Justine

Lady Anne giving orders to Justine

 

I am really looking forward to Monday’s Blackboard… I’ve been around for the rehearsals of this fully staged reading and I feel as if Monday’s audience is definitely in for a wonderful presentation!

A white family has a black slave.  Not during the civil war… Now… and we have a black president… should that even matter?    While having a Black President does not mean that white families with black help have to get white or non-black help, it might make them look at the situation a little differently… especially after seeing this play.

Playwright, Amina Henry was examining Stockholm Syndrome.  I was not very familiar with Stockholm Syndrome, but according to Wikipedia,

“In cases where Stockholm syndrome has occurred, the captive is in a situation where the captor has stripped nearly all forms of independence and gained control of the victim’s life, as well as basic needs for survival. Some experts say that the hostage regresses to, perhaps, a state of infancy; the captive must cry for food, remain silent, and exist in an extreme state of dependence. In contrast, the perpetrator serves as a ‘mother’ figure protecting the ‘child’ from a threatening outside world, including law enforcement’s deadly weapons. The victim then begins a struggle for survival, both relying on and identifying with the captor. Possibly, hostages’ motivation to live outweighs their impulse to hate the person who created their dilemma.”

So think about this through a racial lens, as Amina did – with a black female slave – white married couple …  An America Family Takes a Lover

See you Monday @ 7:30!

(RSVP: info@blackboardplays.com)

-Garlia


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About blackboardplays

Familiar with the collectives for poets and other Black writers that had been created over the years and slightly envious of that sense of community, I became curious about a similar place for playwrights. I wanted to see Black playwrights, actors and directors excited over each others work and supporting each other. I was longing for a “home” as a Black playwright and wanted to see other Black artists in that home, not to be exclusive, but because there was a void. I was also eager to find other Black playwrights who shared a passion for the craft of storytelling. The stories of the Black community are diverse and are often hidden behind the blockbuster stereotyped versions. The non-artistic Black community, not involved in the writing of these stories, is yearning to see themselves in our stories and it is apart of my life’s work to ensure that happens. the cell is any artists’ dream: a new space that supports you as you grow, committed to new work and the art. This allows the writer to focus on the craft - to focus on their story. Nancy Manocherian and Kira Simring welcomed this idea with open arms and instantly became apart of what we later called “Blackboard Reading Series”. Every reading will conclude a twenty minute talk-back with the audience. Dialogue with the community is essential to what we want to do with the series. As we grow, there may be more readings a month, play festivals and of course productions. We want to nurture and develop new black playwrights for this generation! Thank You! Garlia Cornelia Jones Founder, Blackboard Reading Series
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